Posts Tagged ‘Safety’

Recreational Guide: The Arkansas River

October 22nd, 2022

Arkansas River GeographyThe Arkansas River headwaters source is near Leadville,Guest Posting Colorado. The river technically ends in the Mississippi, which leads out to the ocean. The river drops 10,000 feet in the first 125 mile stretch. Within this stretch, the River carves through a large canyon now called the Royal Gorge. Because of the rapid drop of elevation, this stretch of river is popular for whitewater rafting and other river recreation. In total, the river drops 11,400 feet and covers a total of 161,000 square miles. The Arkansas River basin drains 24,904 square miles.From Colorado, the Arkansas River then runs through Kansas, Oklahoma and Arkansas, before meeting up with the Mississippi River. In total the river runs 1450 miles, which makes the Arkansas River the longest tributary in the Mississippi-Missouri water system.Carving out many canyons and gorges, perhaps one of the most well known is the Royal Gorge. With a width of 50 feet at its base and a few hundred feet at its top, and a depth of 1200 feet in places, the 10-mile-long canyon is a narrow, steep crevasse through the granite of Fremont Peak.The Arkansas River is now used as a main waterway for commerce, with the system being formerly called the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System or MKARNS. This specific stretch of the river is 445 miles. It takes a commercial towboat 5 days to travel the MKARNs distance. The commercial stretch of the river has multiple dam and lock systems allowing for greater control over the navigation efforts. The Arkansas River is used for waterway commerce, recreational activities (such as whitewater rafting) and wildlife preservation.Arkansas River HistoryThe Arkansas River was first discovered by Europeans before the Mississippi River in 1541. After Francisco Vasquez de Coronado forded the river, Hernando de Soto was on the lower river, when he later discovered the Mississippi. The Arkansas River had long been used by native Indians, who relied on the river for a source of food and shelter.The Arkansas River was claimed in 1682 by La Salle in the name of the king of France. A few years later, a fort was established on the banks of the mouth of the Arkansas. The river fort was called “poste Aux Arcansas” otherwise known today as the Arkansas Post. This became part of the Louisiana territory, which transferred to the hands of Spain after the Treaty of Paris in 1763.Perhaps the most important part in recent history for the Arkansas River came in 1787, when George Washington claimed that the navigable waters leading to the Mississippi and St. Lawrence.. shall be common highways and forever free…without any tax, impost or duty…” making the Arkansas River free for all future commerce and business. After that, many foreign countries began using the waterways to transport goods inland. In 1803 the United States purchased the Louisiana Territory, including the Arkansas River basin.

Arkansas Tax Deeds

March 28th, 2022

In Arkansas, all counties hold on to tax delinquent properties for one year, and after notifying the property owner, they then deliver the forfeited properties to the Commission of State Lands. The title to the tax delinquent lands shall vest in the State of Arkansas in care of the Commissioner of State Lands. The Commission of State Lands office becomes responsible for organizing and conducting public tax deed sales throughout the Arkansas counties. Sales generally take place throughout the year in various counties.

The county tax collector in each county is in charge of collecting delinquent property tax. Upon proper notification of the property owner, the tax collector will submit the following information relating to each tax delinquent property. This information will be published between 30 and 40 days before the properties are turned over to the Commission of State Lands.

A list of non-redeemed real property;
The names of the property owners of record;
The total amount due to redeem the property, including taxes, penalties, interest, and related costs;
The expiration date of the redemption period; and
Notice that the property will be forfeited to the state unless the property is redeemed prior to the expiration period of redemption.

Tax Deed Sale Process

The Commissioner of State Lands Web site has all of the required information for buying state-owned tax deeds in Arkansas. A schedule of tax deed sales throughout the state and the inventory of properties are published on the Web site. The tax delinquent property sales list contains the name of the property owner, the legal description of the property, the parcel number, the taxes due on the property, and the minimum bid that is required to purchase the tax deed. It is certainly advisable to do the proper research on a property before committing to make a purchase. The things that you will want to know about the property include the assessed and market value of the property, the location and size of the property, any liens, mortgages or other assessments on the property for which the deed holder may be held liable. The Arkansas county Web sites and numerous other online real estate Web sites are good places to assist you in your research.

Interested investors must pre-register if they wish to attend a tax deed sale. The tax deed sale is competitive, meaning that the investor willing to pay the highest amount for a property will win the tax deed. Bidders also have the option to mail in their bid to the office of the Commissioner of State Lands. In most cases, bids must be received no later than seven days prior to the date of sale. For lands that do not sell for the minimum bid amount, either by mail or at the sale, the Commissioner may negotiate a sale. All negotiated sales must have the approval of the Arkansas Attorney General.

For all sales, the first $100 is due in the form of cash, money order, or cashier’s check. The remaining amount may be paid by personal check, but the the deed will not be issued until that check clears. Upon payment of the full price owed, the purchaser will receive a certificate of purchase from the Commissioner of State Lands. It is important to note that the former property owner is given 30 days from the date of the tax deed purchase to redeem the property. If redemption by the former property owner does occur, the tax deed purchaser receives a full refund. If redemption does not occur, the purchaser will receive a limited warranty deed.